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  #21  
Old 14th June 2009, 11:07 AM
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I thought drag me to hell was pants.
But highly amusing for the comedy factor more so better than any film comedy i seen for donkeys yrs.
Horror wise ok i prob not seen as much r know as much as some ppl on here but lately i tend to find there either to teen type and just daft r they relie heavily on gore and no plot story line r anything else to offer msp 100 tears 2 eg

What we realy need is a new some1 like the past master of horror eg cronenberg argento fulci (even tho he over rated in my opinion) to give the horror gener a kick, and not some fly by night director who just wants to gets him self a name and go to any left and gets himself notice eg look at the au films apart from controversy these films have nothing to offer
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Old 14th June 2009, 12:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Make Them Die Slowly View Post
When discussing the future of horror or the genre as a whole ,I think we can become blinkered by our own obsessions within the genre.I think that the genre is piss poor at present with remakes and sequels being the order of the day but I work with a couple of horror fans who love them and think we are in a golden age of horror.The sheer volume of films coming out seems to support this view if you don't use quality as a yard stick.

The genre has always had its low points,look at the 1940s and 1950s not a lot there untill Hammer got going.

There are good films out there being made it's just finding them.

I think we may actually be the problem not the genre as we are the elite of horror fans and demand the best.We are willing to go that bit further to search out treasures both old and new where as mainstream fans are happy with what they are given.We are willing to give ourselves wholeheartedly to the genre when few do.I think this is why, on occasion we can feel the genre is losing its way because it doesn't put in the same effort as ourselves!
Great post MTDS, I agree it is a bit of a 'treasure hunt' with plenty of hit's and misses along the way, and as you pointed out , because we are so passionate about these films there is a great feeling of disappointment when viewing a film that (to us) seems to lack this passion.

A point I'd like to bring-up, which sort of backs up what Peter was also saying is what horror released in the 00's will be considered classics of the future? For instance will the next generation of fans and forums be debating how good Saw is, or whether the Last House on the Left remake is superior to the original? The problem is we lack some perspective on this matter, as we are judging what we view now from our past experiences of the genre, whether they be good or bad and not in a longevical sense; i.e. in 10 years from now will new films such as Martyrs, Drag Me to Hell, Splinter, The Saws be remembered and hailed by many or will they just be forgotten cult relics?
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  #23  
Old 14th June 2009, 12:16 PM
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Originally Posted by NossB View Post
Is there no love for Drag Me To Hell?

I thought that was one of the best horror movies made in a long time.
I haven't seen it, although I very much want to. I've heard mainly good things about it but due to my current aversion to cinemas, I will probably have to wait for the DVD .
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  #24  
Old 14th June 2009, 01:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Neal View Post
I think one of the biggest influences on our view of the genre's past and present is that particular point in our life when we actually became fans of horror movies.
For instance, I started collecting horror on VHS in the late 80's when most releases in Germany and the Uk were cut to shreds, with the following notorious "dire 90's" making even the arrival of a C-class, censored DTV cheapo in your rental store into a minor feast.
There are others on this board, who actually had the pleasure of seeing those early 80's classics on the big cinema screen .
Some fans got into the genre around the "Scream" craze in the late 90's, even more had their first "strong horror" experience with "Saw" or "Hostel".
Each of those different eras suggests a different take on the genre as a whole.
While I personally agree that the "more experienced" fans tend to demand more "originality"/ "quality" of their genre product, it sometimes feels as if the younger ones (and those who've stayed young at heart) seem to have a lot more fun, as I for one wouldn't waste a minute of my lifetime with today's genre movies if I didn't enjoy them any more. (That's why I've basically stopped watching action movies- with the occasional exception, like "Rambo").
Another problem is that even long term fans are often far too focussed on what's happening in Hollywood as an indicator for the genre's health.
Fact is that much stronger and original horror has been made in Asia, other countries- such as France- and even the last decade's UK horror output is shining brightly, enjoying its fair share of fan appreciation.
Let's not forget that "we" don't have to sort out the "classic status" of those 70's/80's movies ourselves- it's been done over the course of decades.
With the current crop of genre movies, it's still totally in the open, which movies will be rewarded with a "cult fave"/"classic" reputation in the years/decades to come.....which is in fact one of many reasons why I find this current state of horror so exciting.
I totally agree with you Peter,when you say at what point in our lives and the genre did we start liking horror.I was lucky growing up in the uk in the 1970s, that there was loads of horror on television.In my early teens I had the joy of uncensored video, then managed to catch the arse end of the slasher genre at the cinema as I got older.

One of the things that really influenced me as a kid and teen was the books and magazines/fanzines that were about.Today with the internet,the sheer amount of information is staggering.I find it really hard to keep up with what is going on in the world of horror let alone watching any of the recent films released.

As to future classics,I think that you are on the money with Asian horror and some of the more recent French films.Though Hollywood still dictates mainstream taste and not so mainstream taste, there is a shift happening away from the USA but how big that will be only the future knows.

Bizzare eye,I'll put money on "Martyrs" being regarded as a classic in the future though in a cult way."Saw" and "Hostel" will be bench mark films for years to come though not in my house!
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  #25  
Old 15th June 2009, 07:03 AM
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The state of horror now is nothing to how it was in the 90s. The main problem is IMO is that followers of the horror genre have had less time to digest the current output as opposed to what as being released in the 70s & 80s. Hell, even hacks like Lucio Fulci and Bruno Mattei are seen as classic directors of the genre now-a-days, because not only people have seen their movies until they’re engraved into our grey matter, but also because we all love sticking on our rose tinted specs.
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Old 15th June 2009, 10:05 AM
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Originally Posted by bizarre_eye View Post
I was expecting it to be shit, but it surprised me in some respects and I quite enjoyed it. The sequels however.... terrible - especially Apocalypse . Extinction wasn't as bad as I thought it would be, but was still pretty dire.
I would rank RE: Apocalypse as the worst film i have ever seen. And remember i have seen Zombie Lake!!
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  #27  
Old 15th June 2009, 04:03 PM
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I would rank RE: Apocalypse as the worst film i have ever seen. And remember i have seen Zombie Lake!!
Zombie Lake's a classic!
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Old 15th June 2009, 08:17 PM
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Originally Posted by NossB View Post
Is there no love for Drag Me To Hell?

I thought that was one of the best horror movies made in a long time.
I really enjoyed this. Much more of a return to 'scary' horror.

I'm not saying it's the best horror film I've ever seen ( but it's certainly the best I've seen in the cinema for a long time ) and it's a massive step in the right direction. Highly recommended.
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  #29  
Old 15th June 2009, 10:02 PM
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I'm a total originals man,but hey,the healthy state of the 'horror economy' just now is a good thing,as it keeps the wallets supplying the money for new productions.Remember in the '90's how close horror became to going 'mainstream'? Films like Single White Female,Fatal Attraction,Sleeping with the Enemy,hell even Seven and Silence of the Lambs....these films WERE the slasher's of that decade.Remember how close icons like Freddy,Jason,Myers,ChuckyLeatherface and company came to going out?
The one thing that revitalised it all back then was the success of SCREAM,which gave us new baddies in the slasher genre,as in Urban Legends,IKWYDLS,etc,etc.
As I say,I'm not a fan of all these remakes,some have surprised me and I've actually enjoyed them.A lot of them have been dire.There have been some great 'original' films such as SAW and the likes.....But the main thing is;whilst these 'bigger' money spinners are making money,then some fatcat studio exec is always gonna greenlight a new horror movie....some may be dreadful....but one or two gems may pop up and will fall into the horror history books,and that I dare say,is what we need;-for horror to constantly reinject itself with new opportunities.
Oh and btw,I think SEVEN and LAMBS are great,but come on let's be honest,they weren't out and out horrors......
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  #30  
Old 15th June 2009, 10:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by reaper72 View Post
I'm a total originals man,but hey,the healthy state of the 'horror economy' just now is a good thing,as it keeps the wallets supplying the money for new productions.Remember in the '90's how close horror became to going 'mainstream'? Films like Single White Female,Fatal Attraction,Sleeping with the Enemy,hell even Seven and Silence of the Lambs....these films WERE the slasher's of that decade.Remember how close icons like Freddy,Jason,Myers,ChuckyLeatherface and company came to going out?
The one thing that revitalised it all back then was the success of SCREAM,which gave us new baddies in the slasher genre,as in Urban Legends,IKWYDLS,etc,etc.
As I say,I'm not a fan of all these remakes,some have surprised me and I've actually enjoyed them.A lot of them have been dire.There have been some great 'original' films such as SAW and the likes.....But the main thing is;whilst these 'bigger' money spinners are making money,then some fatcat studio exec is always gonna greenlight a new horror movie....some may be dreadful....but one or two gems may pop up and will fall into the horror history books,and that I dare say,is what we need;-for horror to constantly reinject itself with new opportunities.
Oh and btw,I think SEVEN and LAMBS are great,but come on let's be honest,they weren't out and out horrors......
I find it really interesting that in the so called "caring, sharing '90s" slashers went mainstream with big stars appearing in horror/thrillers.Anyone have any thoughts on why this happened?

I think the present remake craze is a major symptom of society eating itself or perhaps it is a new art movement with each new remake a variation on a theme.Welcome to horror jazz!

What do people think of the present state of the underground horror scene?I'm bored out of my skull watching serial killer/snuff films that are nothing more than show cases for special effects teams.The only one I really liked was "Slaughter Vomit Dolls" as that truly seemed to be one man's vision and fetish being put out for all the world to see.I didn't mind "Philosophy of a Knife" either, although it was an arse numbing watch at 4 hours.
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