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Old 31st July 2013, 10:00 AM
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Default 2001: A Space Odyssey

I know this film has a lot of fans and film makers gush about it's brilliance but I just can't see the big hoo hah about it. To me it looks like some nice space pictures with classical music over it.

I have bought the film twice - once on the Stanley Kubrick DVD Collection and again on blu in the Stanley Kubrick Visionary Filmmaker Collection. The extras on the blu and PQ is brilliant but I can't see what all the fuss is about, can someone please enlighten me on it's brilliance or what thoughts you have on the film in general
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Old 31st July 2013, 10:04 AM
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I think it's to do with the visuals
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Old 31st July 2013, 10:19 AM
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Yeah, I think you're either with 2001 or against 2001 - not sure if there a middle ground. I'm definitely with it. The film is a work of genius - philosophically rich and open to multiple interpretations about what the film is all about. And from a technical point of view the film trail blazed special effects and the use of existing classical music was revolutionary - not that it hadn't been done before - Swan Lake opens Tod Browning's Dracula but Kubrick's idea to have the space station waltz around the Earth to the strains of The Blue Danube, that juxtaposition of image and music - 21st century technology and 19th century art was genuinely startling at that time. And the jump cut from the bone to satellite is one of the greatest moments in Cinema, 4 million years of evolution sweep by in one cut - extraordinary stuff !
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Old 31st July 2013, 10:58 AM
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It is also something you really have to see at the cinema. But I accept that tis a "marmite" film. I have a mate who says he'd cut 20 minutes out of it.


But then he thinks Armageddeon is a good film.
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Old 31st July 2013, 11:19 AM
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I was really lucky to see the film on the big screen during a re-release about 10 years ago...

John Landis is a fan of the film I'm guessing - a stray line of dialogue from 2001 where someone says "See You next Wednesday" pops up in many Landis films - I could be wrong but it's the name of the blue movie in American Werewolf in London. A very cool little homage I think...
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Old 31st July 2013, 11:24 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wes View Post
I was really lucky to see the film on the big screen during a re-release about 10 years ago...

John Landis is a fan of the film I'm guessing - a stray line of dialogue from 2001 where someone says "See You next Wednesday" pops up in many Landis films - I could be wrong but it's the name of the blue movie in American Werewolf in London. A very cool little homage I think...
He puts the reference in any film of his where he's used an idea from 2001.

The reference appears during the werewolf rampage as the title on the marquee of a porno theater in An American Werewolf in London (1981). It is spoken in German when Vic Morrow is being shot at on the building in the sequence he directed for Twilight Zone: The Movie (1983). In The Blues Brothers (1980) it's on a billboard where the the cops are lying in wait. Then again, it mostly appears as the name on movie posters, so that it probably became merely something to watch for like Alfred Hitchcock's cameos. It first appeared in his first film Schlock (1973) as the name of a movie and as a movie poster in a theater lobby. It appeared again in his second film. The Kentucky Fried Movie (1977), as the title of the "Feel-O-Rama" movie. It surfaces in an apartment in Trading Places (1983) on a movie poster. In Coming to America (1988) it appears in a subway station (the movie claims to star Jamie Lee Curtis, who appeared in "Trading Places"). Another poster is visible in Ophelia's apartment. In Spies Like Us (1985) it appears on the recruitment poster behind the desk of the commander of the army training post. In Into the Night (1985) it appears on two posters in the office where Ed and Diana make the phone call. In Innocent Blood (1992) it is once again advertised on a movie marquee across the street from the Melody Lounge exotic dance bar near where a car crash takes place. It also appears in the Michael Jackson video Thriller (1983) (TV), which was directed by Landis. One of the men chasing the werewolf finds a note and reads this out while the shot shows MJ in the theater eating popcorn.

I'm always on the lookout for it in his films
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Old 31st July 2013, 11:29 AM
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Quote:
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He puts the reference in any film of his where he's used an idea from 2001.

It is spoken in German when Vic Morrow is being shot at on the building in the sequence he directed for Twilight Zone: The Movie (1983)...
Ah that's brilliant !
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Old 31st July 2013, 11:33 AM
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Ah that's brilliant !
Yeah, the rest of them I was familiar with, that one I only found out about the other night when watching Trading Places and reading up on John Landis
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Old 31st July 2013, 11:50 AM
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I'm only speculating here but I imagine Experimental Music was given its widest possible audience with 2001 - with Kubrick using selections from avant-garde composer György Ligeti's work - the eerie choral music featured as the shuttle journeys to the moon base, and later on for the star gate sequence. This is the kind of "difficult" music most people would run a mile from. (I'm thinking also of The Beatles, and their Stockhausen-influenced patchwork Revolution No.9 on the White Album heard in countless unsuspecting homes across the world)
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Old 16th July 2014, 06:46 PM
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Its been about 10 years since I last seen this but from what I remember I think its a brilliant film that is padded out with 30 mins of nonsensical stuff.

The start with the monkeys - I get it, but it has little point to the film.

The trip to Jupiter with the monoliths - weird and boring.

The scenic scenes of people doing crazy stuff in gravity - again boring.

However from the moment HAL kills the crew members, and it becomes a battle of wits it becomes a work of genius.

But then the ending again weird and boring.

Its worth watching for that middle. But in my opinion Stanley kubrick should have cut everything else out and just had the film be about HAL going crazy.
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