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-   -   What Films Have You Seen Recently? (https://www.cult-labs.com/forums/general-film-discussions/220-what-films-have-you-seen-recently.html)

J Harker 5th September 2016 03:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Justin101 (Post 503924)
It's funny because the reasons you state for not liking it are some of the reasons why I really liked it [emoji38] different strokes etc

I wouldn't go as far as saying i didn't like it. Just was disappointed.

gag 5th September 2016 03:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Vampix (Post 503927)
I recently saw three films that I've not had the opportunity to see before -- 300, The Patriot and The Wolf of Wall Street. Great films! :)

Just watched wolf of wall street on tv last night, wasnt that impressed and felt it was dragged out at times, and some scenes where just repeated again and again just done different eg with more people.
Could have shaved a good half hour of the film, got bit bored 2hrs in and went to bed.

Nordicdusk 5th September 2016 04:42 PM

I will be going to the cinema at 8 tonight to see a one off screening of Top Gun one of my favourite films i just hope its not packed with idiots saying the lines along with the film.

gag 5th September 2016 04:45 PM

:
Quote:

Originally Posted by Nordicdusk (Post 503941)
I will be going to the cinema at 8 tonight to see a one off screening of Top Gun one of my favourite films i just hope its not packed with idiots saying the lines along with the film.

Better hide for me saying this :behindsofa: but,
Never watched it, doesnt interest me, and im not a Tom Cruise fan.

Nordicdusk 5th September 2016 04:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gag (Post 503942)
:

im not a Tom Cruise fan.

Oh you are one of those are you ?

:tongue1:

gag 5th September 2016 05:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Nordicdusk (Post 503943)
Oh you are one of those are you ?

:tongue1:

Oh indeed i am, :axekiller: same goes for nicolas cage, Ben stiller, will ferrel, owen wilson.:happy::tongue1:
Im more likely not to watch a film with any of these actors in, even if it was nominated for film of the year. Not that that will likely happen with most of them. Especially With the last 3 more likely to be in top ten 10 worst films of the year.

MacBlayne 5th September 2016 05:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gag (Post 503947)
Oh indeed i am, :axekiller: same goes for nicolas cage, Ben stiller, will ferrel, owen wilson.:happy::tongue1:
Im more likely not to watch a film with any of these actors in, even if it was nominated for film of the year. Not that that will likely happen with most of them. Especially With the last 3 more likely to be in top ten 10 worst films of the year.

The other three I can understand but Nicolas Cage? I like the guy - you can never predict what his next role will be. Not many A-listers have a filmography as eclectic as his.

gag 5th September 2016 05:30 PM

Jason Bourne

Got to agree with the complaints on the camera work of this film.
It stops you from enjoying the film, which is a shame because it isnt to bad,
The camera and angle are all over the place, constantly shaking that when scenes involving showing a txt you struggle to read it, to much zoomed in and pointless close up scenes its distracts you, and thats most of the film, and when action scenes are on it just jumps around quicker than a frog on a hot plate, that you cant get a real grasp of the action and not giving you chance to see it or soak up whats going on.

The fight scene at the end they were so far zoomed in and shaky that it was almost impossible to be able to make out the action.


Shake, rattle, and Bourne! | Roger Ebert's Journal | Roger Ebert

gag 5th September 2016 05:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MacBlayne (Post 503954)
The other three I can understand but Nicolas Cage? I like the guy - you can never predict what his next role will be. Not many A-listers have a filmography as eclectic as his.

Dont get me wrong im not saying he a bad actor, there just that something about him that i cant quite explain.

MacBlayne 5th September 2016 05:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gag (Post 503955)
Jason Bourne

Got to agree with the complaints on the camera work of this film.
It stops you from enjoying the film, which is a shame because it isnt to bad,
The camera and angle are all over the place, constantly shaking that when scenes involving showing a txt you struggle to read it, to much zoomed in and pointless close up scenes its distracts you, and thats most of the film, and when action scenes are on it just jumps around quicker than a frog on a hot plate, that you cant get a real grasp of the action and not giving you chance to see it or soak up whats going on.

The fight scene at the end they were so far zoomed in and shaky that it was almost impossible to be able to make out the action.


Shake, rattle, and Bourne! | Roger Ebert's Journal | Roger Ebert

Paul Greengrass is going to have stop using his mum's old washing machine as replacement tripod.

MacBlayne 5th September 2016 05:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gag (Post 503958)
Dont get me wrong im not saying he a bad actor, there just that something about him that i cant quite explain.

Ah, fair enough. I can't stand Jennifer Lawrence's school of acting. Pause... for... emphasis... when about... to speak... every... second... word!

Nordicdusk 5th September 2016 09:36 PM

Holy S**t that was awesome to finally get to see Top Gun in the cinema. This is something that never happens here i know over in the UK you get chances to see cult friendly films but we have nothing like that over here so when an opportunity pops its amazing. I spend most of my film watching with blood and guts or dark downbeat films so every now and again it's nice to sit down with some fist pumping 80s feel good film and even better on the big screen.

MacBlayne 5th September 2016 09:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Nordicdusk (Post 503995)
Holy S**t that was awesome to finally get to see Top Gun in the cinema. This is something that never happens here i know over in the UK you get chances to see cult friendly films but we have nothing like that over here so when an opportunity pops its amazing. I spend most of my film watching with blood and guts or dark downbeat films so every now and again it's nice to sit down with some fist pumping 80s feel good film and even better on the big screen.

Where was it being shown?

Nordicdusk 5th September 2016 09:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MacBlayne (Post 503997)
Where was it being shown?

Odeon in Waterford not sure if it was been shown in every Odeon country wide.

MacBlayne 5th September 2016 09:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Nordicdusk (Post 503998)
Odeon in Waterford not sure if it was been shown in every Odeon country wide.

It's far from being a favourite of mine, but Scott's use of colours, filters and dynamic angles would have made for a great cinema experience.

iank 5th September 2016 09:47 PM

10 Things I Hate About You. Back in the days of yore, in a time when Hollywood comedies were actually funny and witty and clever rather than just crass and vulgar to make up for a complete lack of intelligence, they made a sort of thin "reimagining" of Shakespeare's Taming of the Shrew with Heath Ledger, Julia Styles, Joseph Gordon-Levitt and the lovely Larissa Oleynik. And yay, it was funny and witty and clever and sweet, in a way that, with all the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune, just does not seem to get made anymore. Or to put it another way, I laughed my ass off at this last night. Something of a classic. :woot:

Mojo 6th September 2016 01:12 PM

CREATURES THE WORLD FORGOT
Or, Creatures They Forgot To Include In The Script, as costly dinosaur animation is replaced with cheap violence and nudity. Mind you, the various stills published over the years are more salacious than anything in the finished film. Quite why Hammer thought anyone would want to sit through 90 minutes of this in 1970 is anybody's guess.
On the plus side, the dvd can be picked up for under a fiver and features a nice looking clean print, as well as a 24 page booklet written by Marcus Hearn.

NAKED GIRL KILLED IN THE PARK
Not nearly as sleazy as the title suggests, this 1972 Giallo features an investigation into the death of a man who had taken out a £1million life insurance policy only 24 hours before.
Not a classic by any means, but it's nice to add another Giallo the collection that I hadn't seen before.
As a side note, watching this horrible looking dvd makes you appreciate even more the great work the likes of Arrow, Camera Obscura, 88 Films et al are doing in restoring these titles in all their HD glory.

Demoncrat 6th September 2016 02:48 PM

Watched Green Street 3 (James Nunn)

And wished that I hadn't. Scott Adkins (a buff Rob Brydon cough) finds out 'is little bruvver has been snuffed by a rival firm. Back from "sweaty sockland" (:whip:) 'e sorts out the firm 'e left behind then gets stuck into the opposition.
Utter shite. Gave up counting after 4 montage sequences. Carver from The Bill puts his oar in. Actually worse than the first film, which is exemplary in itself haha. AVOID. The Firm was funnier haha not.

MacBlayne 6th September 2016 02:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Demoncrat (Post 504047)
Watched Green Street 3 (James Nunn)

The Firm was funnier haha not.

What's John Grisham got to do with football hooligans? :D

Justin101 6th September 2016 03:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Nordicdusk (Post 503995)
Holy S**t that was awesome to finally get to see Top Gun in the cinema. This is something that never happens here i know over in the UK you get chances to see cult friendly films but we have nothing like that over here so when an opportunity pops its amazing. I spend most of my film watching with blood and guts or dark downbeat films so every now and again it's nice to sit down with some fist pumping 80s feel good film and even better on the big screen.

Luckily, in Liverpool there are always screening of older movies, I've seen the likes of Dawn... and Day of the Dead, Inferno, Pet Semetary, Blood and Black Lace, Big, Back to the Future... the list is endless.

Seeing these films with an audience who know them is a brilliant experience and almost always makes for a great night!

Justin101 6th September 2016 03:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by iank (Post 504001)
10 Things I Hate About You. Back in the days of yore, in a time when Hollywood comedies were actually funny and witty and clever rather than just crass and vulgar to make up for a complete lack of intelligence, they made a sort of thin "reimagining" of Shakespeare's Taming of the Shrew with Heath Ledger, Julia Styles, Joseph Gordon-Levitt and the lovely Larissa Oleynik. And yay, it was funny and witty and clever and sweet, in a way that, with all the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune, just does not seem to get made anymore. Or to put it another way, I laughed my ass off at this last night. Something of a classic. :woot:

One of the best, and obviously people also forget that Clueless was a similar re-imagining of Jane Austen's Emma, which is also a cracking 90's comedy.

Dave Boy 7th September 2016 09:33 PM

http://images.yuku.com/image/jpeg/01...233c4b03ea.jpg
SUPERMAN THE MOVIE (1978)

For me, the best ever Superman film and the best Superman in Christopher Reeve. This is straight out of the comics and the casting is all round excellent. Who can forget Lois Lane's night flight with Superman?
The opening titles with John Williams score sends a shiver down the spine.
Awesome !

gag 7th September 2016 09:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dave Boy (Post 504225)
http://images.yuku.com/image/jpeg/01...233c4b03ea.jpg
SUPERMAN THE MOVIE (1978)

For me, the best ever Superman film and the best Superman in Christopher Reeve. This is straight out of the comics and the casting is all round excellent. Who can forget Lois Lane's night flight with Superman?
The opening titles with John Williams score sends a shiver down the spine.
Awesome !

Couldnt agree more, even if they casted the perfect role for superman they would just balls the film up with loads of cgi and action, ive always moaned they dont make films like this these days, films use to be films, now its all how much crash bang wallop, more bigger and better souless action, can you cram into a film, cgi, huge budget, who who in the film, but thin on plot, story, character building, tbh i hate most Blockbuster / hollywood films nowadays.

Nosferatu@Cult Labs 7th September 2016 10:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gag (Post 504231)
Couldnt agree more, even if they casted the perfect role for superman they would just balls the film up with loads of cgi and action, ive always moaned they dont make films like this these days, films use to be films, now its all how much crash bang wallop, more bigger and better souless action, can you cram into a film, cgi, huge budget, who who in the film, but thin on plot, story, character building, tbh i hate most Blockbuster / hollywood films nowadays.

You're watching the wrong films! They tend to be better (quality wise) I've found if they are from continental or Eastern Europe – including Turkey – and are subtitled.

gag 7th September 2016 10:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Nosferatu@Cult Labs (Post 504241)
You're watching the wrong films! They tend to be better (quality wise) I've found if they are from continental or Eastern Europe – including Turkey – and are subtitled.

Cheers but im not, hence did say hate most Hollywood/Blockbuster films so cos i have a disliking for them i generally avoid or dont watch them, has to really grab me nowadays, love watching korean and j horror, and subtitled films in general.

Point what im trying to say is these type of films even if good are are pretty poor by todays standards, compared to how films use to be. I think Hollywood etc gone down hill in film standards (dont get me wrong still some fantastic films about) that its become the norm for a film to be rubbish or for you to be disappointed.

Years ago going video shop you could spend a hour trying to find what to watch because so many films took youre fancy and bob told you so and so film was good, you would wade through lots of good films to find a bad one,
Nowadays most people complain so and so film rubbish, you watch more films that you dislike one way or other to find one that you really like.
Hence why a higher % of most film collections consists of older films from years ago or before year 2000, with odd exception of j horror and french korean etc films
But im mainly talking about Blockbuster / Hollywood films in general, not the whole film industry etc
There is some fantastic films out there to be found you just have to stray a little from mainstream.

Demdike@Cult Labs 7th September 2016 11:28 PM

1 Attachment(s)
The Raid (2011)

A second viewing of this action spectacular and whilst i enjoyed it a lot more than the first time i saw it, The Raid is a film i still feel is full of flaws.

Following a gripping opening hour we seem to fall into a trap of seemingly endless video game style hand to hand combat. Where in the opening half, bad guys were dealt with by single blows or stabs for example, the second half just goes on and on. The same three characters punching, throwing, kicking, each other with no seeming effect. The chief bad ass even gets a glass fluorescent tube stabbed into his neck with blood spurting everywhere but still he fights on as if it were merely a scratch. Realism that was apparent early doors was discarded completely.

This switch in tone doesn't work in my opinion and really lets down a film that had action classic stamped all over it up to the hour.

gag 7th September 2016 11:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Demdike@Cult Labs (Post 504249)
The Raid (2011)

A second viewing of this action spectacular and whilst i enjoyed it a lot more than the first time i saw it, The Raid is a film i still feel is full of flaws.

Following a gripping opening hour we seem to fall into a trap of seemingly endless video game style hand to hand combat. Where in the opening half, bad guys were dealt with by single blows or stabs for example, the second half just goes on and on. The same three characters punching, throwing, kicking, each other with no seeming effect. The chief bad ass even gets a glass fluorescent tube stabbed into his neck with blood spurting everywhere but still he fights on as if it were merely a scratch. Realism that was apparent early doors was discarded completely.

This switch in tone doesn't work in my opinion and really lets down a film that had action classic stamped all over it up to the hour.

Yes see what you mean, as much the film concept is kinda none stop roller coaster action, a little bit of realism wouldnt go amiss as well, doesnt matter how good, tough, or hard you are if someone stabbed something into youre neck chances are you wouldn't last much longer to carry on a fight even if by chance you survived..
And sometimes just a tadge realism in a film can make a whole lot of difference.

Demoncrat 8th September 2016 05:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MacBlayne (Post 504048)
What's John Grisham got to do with football hooligans? :D

Why I oughta!! :lol:

The Singing Ringing Tree (1957, Francesco Stefani)

Due to the Marxist enclave at the BBC which gave us all those wonderful Eastern Bloc kids programmes, I still have fond memories of being terrified of dwarves as a child. Watching this now (Network's restoration looks vibrant imho), it is easier to see that the titular plant is a metaphor for Communism. And why not?? Watched it with the rather plummy BBC "narration" to see if it sparked any memories. It didn't :laugh:.


The Offence (1972, Sidney Lumet)

The film you should all rave about instead of Zardoz :rolleyes:.
A child killer is on the loose, and Sgt Thompson thinks they've caught their man??
As British as fried fish (except for the director!! Nurse!!), this is a film I come back to again and again. Even watched it with my mother once (but then I watched La Luna with ma, and her comments during that were priceless). Possibly I should mention that it's Connery, S. as the bobby cough.

Demdike@Cult Labs 9th September 2016 07:39 PM

1 Attachment(s)
The Earth Dies Screaming (1964)

When you think of Terence Fisher, one of British cinemas greats in my opinion you should instantly think of his Hammer film catalogue - Dracula, The Mummy, Curse of Frankenstein and The Devil Rides Out - are all part of a significant canon of classic British horror films directed by Fisher. Among all the Hammer was this curio, The Earth Dies Screaming. A science fiction gem that is often overlooked.

Clocking in at a mere 61 minutes the film romps along following a small band of survivors after an unexplained event left the country's population dead. However this disparate group are not alone as alien robots are also stalking the countryside.

Following one of the most downbeat openings i can recall, Fisher throws us straight into a 70's Doctor Who adventure as it utilizes much of the aspects of 70's Who. The sleepy English village, a race against time,walking corpses, Cybermen...but Fisher and script writer Harry Cross gave us this well before Doctor Who even thought of these ideas, making The Earth Dies Screaming something of a visionary piece of British sci-fi.

Cross's script is simple but intelligent. We don't get any answers as to why and how events took place nor who or what the robots are. Like the characters, we just know they did take place. Also the resolution is worked out through guess work and understanding communication methods rather than on an interplanetary scale.

It's not all brilliant, though much of it is. Lead actress Virginia Field appears to play her role in slow motion, especially when pursued and... No, that's about it. The Earth Dies Screaming is actually rather brilliant.

Buboven 10th September 2016 12:08 AM

Despite all the controversy and fuss over the transfers of the Female Scorpion films I am so glad I bought the set, I really really like all the films in the series so far, with my favourite being Beast Stable.

Female Scorpion 701 - 8/10

Jailhouse 42 - 8/10

Beast Stable - 9/10

gag 10th September 2016 08:05 PM

For some reason because im 48 i fancy watching a film from year i was born and watch 1 film from every year over next 48 days.

What 10 films should you think i should watch from

1968 to 1978.

Something good and different doesnt have to be a horror or a well known film. But not something obvious.

I'll leave it for a few for days then i see what people opinion are.

Demdike@Cult Labs 10th September 2016 08:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gag (Post 504598)
For some reason because im 48 i fancy watching a film from year i was born and watch 1 film from every year over next 48 days.

What 10 films should you think i should watch from

1968 to 1978.

Something good and different doesnt have to be a horror or a well known film. But not something obvious.

I'll leave it for a few for days then i see what people opinion are.

Start a thread, gag. I'll happily throw in a few ideas for you.

If you review them it will be a worthwhile exercise.

Nosferatu@Cult Labs 10th September 2016 08:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gag (Post 504598)
For some reason because im 48 i fancy watching a film from year i was born and watch 1 film from every year over next 48 days.

What 10 films should you think i should watch from

1968 to 1978.

Something good and different doesnt have to be a horror or a well known film. But not something obvious.

I'll leave it for a few for days then i see what people opinion are.

1968 – Rosemary's Baby
1969 – The Wild Bunch
1970 – Beneath The Planet of the Apes
1971 – The French Connection
1972 – The Godfather
1973 – The Exorcist
1974 – the Godfather: Part II
1975 – One Flew over the Cuckoo's Nest
1976 – Taxi Driver
1977 – Suspiria
1978 – Dawn of the Dead (I know you like Superman, but you've recently watched it)

Nosferatu@Cult Labs 10th September 2016 08:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Demdike@Cult Labs (Post 504600)
Start a thread, gag. I'll happily throw in a few ideas for you.

If you review them it will be a worthwhile exercise.

Great idea. You could call it 'gag's birthday films' or something like that.

Demdike@Cult Labs 11th September 2016 11:20 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Blue Crush 2 (2011)

Haunted by the memory of her deceased mother, Dana leaves Malibu behind and heads to South Africa to fulfill her mother's dream of surfing Jefferys Bay.

In name only sequel to the 2002 film, this South African set direct to dvd release was a bit of a delight.

Yes the plot is slight, cliche ridden and almost casually deals with many problems that still blight South Africa, such as integration of blacks onto white beaches and the ivory trade and makes them right in the world of Blue Crush 2 at least. But it's all done with such a verve, and rides along on sunny waves of joy that i didn't really care. English actress Sasha Jackson playing the lead role of Dana had such an infectious enthusiasm about her, as did most of the surfer/ beach types that she hung out with, making the film difficult not to like, especially with it's chilled out atmosphere. Even bad girl Tara, Sharni Vinson, came good in the end, however that wasn't difficult to predict.

In among the plot which really is more a young woman's coming of age story disguised as an odyssey, there's some breathtaking cinematography along the South African coast line and excitingly wild surfing sequences.

Blue Crush 2 is one of those feel good films that's actually hard not to enjoy* and i know it's one i'll return to in the future.

*Obviously B_E, Nos and gag, i'm not referring to you three here.

Demdike@Cult Labs 11th September 2016 12:47 PM

1 Attachment(s)
The Washing Machine (1993)

Three sisters report the body of a man, sliced up in their washing machine, however when the police arrive no body is to be found.

This Hungarian set giallo thriller from director Ruggero Deodato is a mixed bag. Intensely flawed yet all rather watchable thanks to a pervasive slutty air of sexuality.

The films main fault is in the script. At the centre of things is a detective's investigation into the possibility that a man, who appears to have vanished without a trace, was brutally murdered by one of the women. As he gets drawn deeper into a web of deceit he shags all three sisters, not exactly keeping it a secret either, as one escapade happens in a museum overlooking Budapest's Heroes Square during a trip with a blind school, it's actually a rather amusing sequence, truth be told. How this would stand in court should a conviction arise bemused me, but obviously Deodato thought it fine. He's probably duped the world into thinking it's a socio political commentary on 90's Budapest by now, genius that he is.

It might seem a minor issue that i've highlighted but, and it's a big but, not a lot other than sexy shenanigans actually happens during the bulk of the 86 minutes run time. The three sisters - Kashia Figura, Barbara Ricci and Ilaria Borrelli - do well in their seductive roles especially Figura who has a cheap whorish charm i find rather endearing and exciting. French actor Philippe Caroit, someone i confess to not knowing, holds it all together quite well.

As far as gialli goes The Washing Machine is nowhere near the top of the pile, in fact it's barely a giallo at all in the conventional sense, certainly as far as giallo motifs go. For this reason i regard the film as a curio rather than a must see film, however i rather enjoyed it.

Nosferatu@Cult Labs 11th September 2016 04:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Demdike@Cult Labs (Post 504636)
Blue Crush 2 (2011)

Blue Crush 2 is one of those feel good films that's actually hard not to enjoy* and i know it's one i'll return to in the future.

*Obviously B_E, Nos and gag, i'm not referring to you three here.

I'll have you know that I enjoy lightweight, clichι ridden movies every now and again – I had a great time watching Sharknado 4 on Thursday night. I'm not sure whether I've seen the first Blue Crush but, as you said, it probably wouldn't affect my understanding your enjoyment of this (very) loose sequel.

trebor8273 11th September 2016 06:47 PM

2 Attachment(s)
The black death

A young monk is recruited by Sean Bean and is party of soldiers to investigate a remote village which is said to be free from the black death. Enjoyable and atmospheric with competent performances all round and Bean doing want he does best dying. 7.8/10


Mutant chronicles

Thosands of years in earths past a secret religious group shut down a ancient machine that creates horrific mutants with one goal to whipe out mankind.

Jump forward the future in which 4 mega corporations battle for control of the planet, two of these accidentally restart the machine and unleash the the mutant machine on the mankind once again, the corporation's decide to abandon earth and head out for mars and the moon leaving many millions behind. One of the corpartions is visited by the leader of the secret society ( Ron Pearlman) who has a plan to recruit a small band of warriors to find the machine and shut it down.

Enjoyable and gory hokum with steampunk the technology and a ww1 vibe d an though its set hundreds of years in the future. Most of the special effects etc are CGI and most of the time they work very well apart from the explosions and blood. 7.9/10

Now watching stigmata

bizarre_eye@Cult Labs 11th September 2016 08:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Demdike@Cult Labs (Post 504636)
*Obviously B_E, Nos and gag, i'm not referring to you three here.

"Feel Good"...??

Does not compute.

iank 12th September 2016 08:26 AM

Monty Python's Meaning of Life. The weakest of the three MP movies, given it's basically just an extended episode of the sketch show rather than an actual film/story, but amusing enough.


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